Frequently Asked Questions

A:
It is the minimum distance an object must be for it to be brought into focus.

A:
Most Bushnell binoculars are fitted with rubber eyecups that can be twisted or rolled down for an improved field of view with glasses.

A: Individual eye strengths vary as do fingerprints. Please refer to the instructions below for your individual type of binocular.

CENTER FOCUS and INSTA-FOCUS

1. Adjust the interpupillary distance.

2. Set the ‘diopter setting’ (normally on the right lens) to zero and view a distant object.

3. Keep both eyes open at all times.

4. Using a lens cover or your hand, cover the objective (front) lens of the side with the diopter setting ring.

5. Using the focus adjustment, focus on the distant object being viewed.

6. Cover the other objective lens, then view the same object as above.

7. Using the diopter setting adjustment ring, focus on the same distant object as previous.

8. Your binocular should now be adjusted for your eyes. Make a note of the diopter for future use.

* Notes: Zoom Binoculars should be focused at the highest power possible. Perma-Focus® Binoculars do not require adjustment and use your eyes own ability to accommodate, most users have no difficulty with these models.

A:
No. The distance between the eyes, called ‘interpupillary distance’, varies from person to person and your binocular must be adjusted accordingly.

1. Hold your binoculars in the normal viewing position.

2. Grasp each barrel firmly. Move the barrels closer together of further apart until you see a single circular field. Always re-set your binoculars to this position before using.

A:
The size of the objective lens on binoculars aids in the binoculars ability to gather light. The larger the lens the more light that is captured giving you a brighter image.

A:
The first number is always going to be the magnification. This will tell you how much closer (8x) the subject will appear when viewing thru the binocular. The second number is the diameter of the objective lens in millimeters.

A:
Since the prisms in the binocular overlaps closely, the objective lens and the oculars lens are aligned, the binoculars will be slimmer, more streamlined, less bulky and more rugged than a Porro-Prism binocular.

A:

When handled with care, your binoculars will provide years of trouble free service. Like any precision instrument your binocular should be given reasonable protection.

1. If binoculars feature rubber “fold-down” eyecups, store them with the eyecups up. This avoids excessive stress and wear placed on the rubber eyecups in the down position. Twist-up and pop-up eyecups can be stored in either position.

2. Avoid banging and dropping.

3. Store in a cool, dry place. Avoid storing in your vehicle as temperature fluctuations and prolonged vibration can damage any optical instrument.

4. Never look directly at the sun with your binocular. It may be very harmful to your eyes.

5. Keep your lenses clean with the following instructions.

  • Blow away any dust or debris on the lens (or use a soft lens brush).
  • Remove dirt or fingerprints with a soft cotton cloth by rubbing in a circular motion.
  • Coarse cloth or unnecessary rubbing may scratch the lens surface causing permanent damage.


6. For a more thorough cleaning, you may use photographic quality lens tissue and cleaner. Always apply the fluid to the paper or the cloth, not directly on the lens. The new microfiber cleaning cloths and “lens pens” are also highly recommended. They do not require cleaning fluid.

A:
This will designate that you have a low battery.

A:
Usually this is caused by the unit suffering some type of impact which misaligns the unit. I suggest contact our Service Center by visiting ultimosupport.co.za

A:

Current Models:

Model:Description:Battery:
204101Legend 1200 ARCCR2 Lithium
204100Legend 1200 ARCCR2 Lithium
201942Scout 1000 w/ARCCR2 Lithium
201932Scout 1000 w/ARCCR2 Lithium
202204Bowhunter Chuck AdamsCR2 Lithium
202201Sport 600CR2 Lithium
201921Sport 4509-Volt Alkaline
201916Sport 4509-Volt Alkaline
204124Yardage Pro RiflescopeCR2 Lithium


Archived Models:

Model:Description:Battery:
200602Yardage Pro 6009-Volt Alkaline
200003WYardage Pro LegendCR2 Lithium
201319Yardage Pro Legend Mossy OakCR2 Lithium
200836Yardage Pro Quest2 AA Alkaline
201920Yardage Pro Sport 4509-Volt Alkaline
200001Yardage Pro ScoutCR2 Lithium
203000Yardage Pro Scout Real TreeCR2 Lithium
201315Yardage Pro Scout Mossy OakCR2 Lithium
202018Yardage Pro Trophy9-Volt Alkaline
202020Yardage Pro Trophy Mossy Oak9-volt Alkaline
200405Yardage Pro 4009-Volt Alkaline
200500Yardage Pro 5009-Volt Alkaline
200750Yardage Pro 7509-Volt Alkaline
201000Yardage Pro 10009-Volt Alkaline
200880Yardage Pro 8004 (AAA) Alkaline
205100Yardage Pro 15009-Volt Alkaline
205101Yardage Pro 1500 w/ARC9-Volt Alkaline
201931Scout 1000 w/ARCCR2 Lithium
201941Scout 1000 Real Tree w/ARCCR2 Lithium

A:
All Bushnell Rangefinders have a class one laser.

A:
Yes. All of Bushnell’s Night Vision products include shield-encased image intensifiers to block x-rays. All of Bushnell’s infrared illuminators utilize harmless filtered incandescent bulbs or light emitting diodes (LED’s) instead of lasers.  

A:
No. This unit must be powered off by pressing the on-off button located on the back lower side of the unit.

A:
No. This unit must be powered off by pressing the on-off button located on the back lower side of the unit.

A:
Bushnell Night Vision products collect and amplify existing light through the objective lens which is then focused on the image intensifier. Inside the intensifier, a photocathode is “excited” by the light and converts the photon energy in to electrons. These electrons accelerate across an electrostatic field inside the intensifier and strike a phosphor screen (like a green monochrome TV screen) which emits an image that you can see. It is the acceleration of electrons, which provides gain and enhances the image.

A:
It takes 2 hours to charge the battery. The charger has a LED light on it which will remain red while charging, and then turn green when the unit is charged.

A:
The number one damage factor is using the device in bright light. While all Bushnell Night Vision devices have a cut-off circuit when over exposed, exposure will shorten the life span of a night vision device. Exposure to rain, fog, or even extremely high humidity may damage night vision devices. Built for use at night, they can withstand short exposure to dampness or high humidity conditions. Night Vision devices have delicate vacuum intensifier tubes that are sensitive to impact and should be handled carefully. Clean lenses the same way you would your camera. The lenses are optically coated and may be scratch if abrasive material is used or if dirt is rubbed into the glass. Usually there is no need to remove the lenses and clean inside. Storage for long periods is best in a cool dry place with the batteries removed.

A:
Night Vision devices operate as a light amplifier for light in the “near visible” light range. Generally, this is in the 750-850 nanometer range. It can not detect heat, which is at a much lower end of the light spectrum and requires thermal imaging technology.

A:
All Bushnell Night Vision Monocular scopes are activated in a way that can not be left on when not in use. The power button is designed to give power only while being depressed. The binocular devices do have on/off switches that require the user to remember to turn off the unit. Some level of “buzzing” sound is quite normal and is intended to be useful in remembering to turn off these units when done using them. The image of a night vision device will not be as sharp as that of a daylight binocular. This is due largely to the image being generated on a phosphor screen. Black spots may be visible in the image. This comes as a natural process of manufacturing the intensifier tubes.

A:
Recreational uses consist of camping, hiking, fishing, boating, and nature viewing. Other uses include surveillance, search and rescue, and property management.

A:
The key difference between the night vision generations is the intensifier technology. Gen. I devices use an intensifier tube that amplifies ambient light by accelerating electrons and striking a phosphor surface just like a television. Generation II devices add a micro-channel plate that multiplies the number of electrons before they impinge on the phosphor screen, thus increasing gain; Generation III devices further add a Gallium Arsenide photocathode which creates significantly more photoelectrons than Gen. II devices.

Generation II and III devices offer greater light amplification but a price beyond the reach of most buyers. Generation I devices are high quality and provide light amplification adequate for most recreational activities and for many professional uses.

Bushnell has introduced an Advanced Night Vision device that produces images comparable to Generation 2 devices. The Advanced Night Vision device does not contain a Micro Channel plate, but uses fiber optic bundles to eliminate distortion thus providing excellent resolution and a flat field of view. The result is superior image quality comparable to Generation 2 devices at half the cost.

A:
It varies anywhere from 1-1800 feet. The maximum viewing distance depends on the conditions of use and upon model chosen. Overcast conditions, fog, rain; etc. may reduce the effective distance of a night vision. An Infrared Illuminator will increase viewing range, especially in enclosed areas like a warehouse, cave, or thick brush.

A:

 

Bushnell Night Vision products are unquestionably warranted to be free of defects in material and workmanship for two years after the date of purchase. In the event of a defect under this warranty, we will at our option, repair or replace the product.

A:
Night Vision devices are designed for use in the dark. It may be harmful and can damage the device if you use it during the daytime or in other very bright situations. Keep in mind that strong direct light, such as projectors, car headlamps, strong flashlights, and so on, may be harmful to your Night Vision unit if you direct your device at the source of these intense lights. With this said, Bushnell Night Vision devices have electronic protection against such damage. Most of these simply turn off overloaded circuits, but some have more sophisticated and separate light sensing mechanisms.

A:
A Night Vision scope is made up of a set of optics (glass), a simple power supply (batteries, wire, transformer, regulators and capacitors) and an image intensifier (a glass vacuum tube with a light sensitive coating at one end and a phosphor screen at the other).

A:
The short answer is that you don’t see through the night vision device, rather you see the phosphor screen on the back of the tube. The objective lens focuses the image on to the front of the intensifier tube. That image is then converted in to electron energy. It paints that picture on the back of the tube. You need to have a sharp image to start with. Then your eye needs to be focused onto the back of the tube where the image resides. Every eye is different and therefore the ocular focus is very important. Focus the ocular first and then move to the objective lens. You may have to adjust each lens several times before getting a sharp image.

A:
A Night Vision scope is made up of a set of optics (glass), a simple power supply (batteries, wire, transformer, regulators and capacitors) and an image intensifier (a glass vacuum tube with a light sensitive coating at one end and a phosphor screen at the other).

A:
The more you magnify the more light you lose.

A:

The following tips can help even the best hunters odds:

  • A variable power scope should be set to its lowest power for fast target acquisition. High powers should be reserved for long range, controlled shots.
  • Lens caps provide good protection in foul weather by should be removed when stalking or still shooting to save time in snap shooting situations. Take off transparent or tinted covers to avoid image distortion. Bushnell optics are recessed to avoid lens contamination with lens covers removed.
  • Using a Bushnell Bore Sighter is recommended after any fall or mishap to assure the zero point of your rifle.
  • Storing your rifle and scope overnight in the outdoors will help avoid external fogging of optics. In extreme cold, cycle the action a few times to loosen it up prior to returning to the hunt.

A:

Your riflescope needs to be focused only once-for YOUR eyes. If another shooter uses your scope, it must be refocused for their eyes. The following steps will assist in proper focusing of your riflescope with a traditional style focus ring. If you have a scope with a fast focus eyepiece, skip steps 1, 2 and 9.

  1. Grasp the knurled eyepiece lock ring and loosen by turning the eyepiece counter clockwise.
  2. Turn the lock ring clockwise about five turns.
  3. Look through the scope at a bright background such as the sky or a well lighted wall. (Never look at the sun!) Focusing is easier with the scope mounted on a rifle or some firm object.
  4. Turn the eyepiece, counter clockwise, until the reticle appears slightly blurred.
  5. Turn the eyepiece, clockwise, until the reticle comes into focus.
  6. Look away from the scope for a few seconds. Then look back quickly through the scope. If the reticle appears sharp and clear the instant you place your eye to the scope, the focus has been properly set for your eyes. Try this several times.
  7. If the reticle appears fuzzy, or requires a little time to come into sharp focus, further adjustment is needed. Turn the eyepiece clockwise another full turn and repeat STEP 8.
  8. Keep doing this until the reticle is sharp the instant you put your eye to the scope.
  9. When satisfied with your focus, tighten the lock ring against the eyepiece firmly.

A:
Proper mounting is best performed by a professional gunsmith or experienced hunter. For detailed instructions feel free to contact our customer service department via E-Mail or phone (800-423-3537), or contact your local gunsmith.

A:
As convenient as vehicle storage may be, it can also be detrimental to your scope. Closed vehicles retain very high levels of heat. This intense heat could adversely affect the lubricants and sealants in your scope. Another danger comes from the constant vibration of a traveling vehicle as it can loosen your mounts and affect the zero point of your rifle.

A:
Three things will determine light transmission: The glass used in the lenses. The use of an anti-reflective lens coating. Effective use of the lenses in the scope.

A:
With proper care, your scope should last you a lifetime. When cleaning the lenses, reasonable precautions are necessary. Dry dirt and dust can be removed by air blast or with a soft brush. Fingerprints and lubricants can be wiped off with an eyeglass tissue or a cotton swab and a mild soap solution. Use the lens covers supplied with your scope whenever convenient.

A:

Current Models:

Model:Description:Battery:
7301311X28 TROPHY RED DOT SCOPECR2032 Lithium
730132A1X28 TROPHY REDDOT AUTO ON-OFFCR2032 Lithium
730132P1X32 TROPHY MP RED GREEN DOTCR2032 Lithium
7301341X28 TROPHY R-DOT 4CRS HAIRSCR2032 Lithium
730134C1X28TRPHYM REDDOT4XHAIRS-CLMCR2032 Lithium
7301351X28 TROPHY RED/GREEN DOT,4RETCR2032 Lithium
730135PTROPHY MP 3.5X REDGREEN DOTCR2032 Lithium
733125E3-12X56 TROPHY 30MM, IRCR2032 Lithium
737000VVIDEOSCOPEInternal Lithium-Ion Rechargeable
713949I3-9X40M BANNER, RED GREEN IRCR2032 Lithium
713959I3-9X50M BANNER, RED GREEN IRCR2032 Lithium
714164I4-16X40M BANNER, RED GREEN IRCR2032 Lithium
7201301X23 SPTMN ILL. DOT W/RGS HNGNCR2032 Lithium
723950MI3-9X50M SPORTSMAN W/IRCR2032 Lithium

 

Archived Models:

Model:Description:Battery:
500021Original HolosightN Cell Batteries
510021Compact HolosightN Cell Batteries
XXXXXXLite Sight RiflescopeCR2032 Lithium Battery
XXXXXXBanner Lite Sight RiflescopeSR 44A Sony
7115621.5-6X21 BANNER LITE-SITEA76 Batteries
XXXXXXBushnell Trophy Red DotCR2032

A:
None, with proper care and mounting, your scope should last a lifetime. Due to the unique internal seals and special lubricants your scope can maintain a dry gas atmosphere to prevent fogging of the lenses in any conditions. No lubricants or solvents are required to preserve mechanical function.

A:
It is the minimum distance an object must be for it to be brought into focus.

A:

A spotting scope is a small telescope that has been modified for use by day. A spotting scope differs from an astronomical telescope in several important ways.

First, a spotting scope always produces an upright image whereas a telescope used in astronomy may produce a reversed image or even an upside down image (not a problem for astronomy).

Second, a spotting scope is much smaller in size than an astronomical telescope, mainly for the sake of portability.

Third, a spotting scope is a lower magnification instrument than a telescope, since the atmosphere by day does not allow the high magnifications used in astronomy.

Fourth, a spotting scope is mounted on an ordinary photo tripod, but a telescope for astronomy requires a very specialized mount, often unsuitable for daytime use.

Lastly, many, if not most, spotting scopes are waterproof and fogproof – a rare feature in an astronomical telescope.

A:
Since the prisms in the binocular overlaps closely, the objective lens and the oculars lens are aligned, the binoculars will be slimmer, more streamlined, less bulky and more rugged than a Porro-Prism binocular.

A:
Most first-time telescope users know little or nothing about the night sky, and you certainly do not need a course in astronomy to enjoy your telescope to the fullest. Begin with the objects easiest to find: the Moon, Jupiter, Saturn, Venus, and Mars. All of these are bright objects even in the midst of a big-city environment and can be located by using star maps in popular monthly magazines such as Astronomy or Sky & Telescope.

A:
Some types of objects (e.g., nebulae and galaxies) are best observed in a dark-sky environment, although even many of these are clearly observable through small telescopes in the city. The Moon and planets, by contrast, can be studied about equally well from the city or country. The basic rule is that while observations made outside the city generally reveal more detail, particularly in deep space, there are still a great many objects within the grasp of a small telescope in urban areas.

A:

Certainly, here is an excerpt from one of our publications:

For beginners it is best to put in some practice by viewing terrest-rial objects during the day. Initial experience can be gained during this time of the operation and use of your telescope. If your telescope is equipped with a moon filter, be sure to remove it from the ocular, do this before viewing objects and only use the filter(s) for their intended use.

Never mount more than one accessory (except moon filter) with your ocular lens. This shifts your focal length and prevents you from getting a proper focus, (Example: Barlow and Star Diagonal, 2Omm ocular lens.

Let’s talk about POWER: It’s a natural tendency for all of us to want to magnify the moon, planets and stars as much as possible so as to be able to see it as closely as we can. Wouldn’t it be wonderful to see the “canals” on Mars or the ice cap on Jupiter or the Apollo landing sights on the moon?

Yet, the pure and simple physics of light transmission, refraction and magnification through optical lenses make this a very challenging task. As one seeks to increase magnification of an image, more and more of the light is lost or reflected. And as more magnification is achieved, the more interference occurs from ambient or casual light sources, as well as from the atmosphere itself. That is why the more experienced telescope user knows that viewing is generally more enjoyable at lower powers.

That is why we suggest you begin learning about your new telescope by starting at the lower powers. After you gain some skill and practice at low powers, you can carefully move up when viewing conditions are best. By starting with the lowest powered ocular lens, this allows you to focus in and find objects prior to using the higher powered oculars (5mm, 6mm, 4mm or 2x Barlow) produces a smaller field of view. If the image is fuzzy at higher magnification, drop down to a lower magnification as the atmospheric conditions are not sufficient to support the high magnification at observation time. Remember, the higher the number on the ocular, the lower the power. To figure the power of an ocular lens you divide the number on the ocular into in to the focal length of the telescope. (Example: 700mm/20mm=35x). Avoid touching or jarring the scope while viewing. This results in vibration that causes the image to shimmy or move. Also make sure that all assembly screws are secured as tightly as possible. When viewing at night, allow at least 15 minutes for your eyes to become adapted to the dark. If you wear glasses, remove them when viewing through your scope unless you have an astigmatism.

A:
The power of your telescope can be determined by dividing the focal length of the objective lens by the focal length of the eyepiece. The eyepiece focal length is the number printed on the eyepiece (for example: 1000 divided by 25=40X).

A:

Aligning the finderscope can be accomplished following these steps.

  1. With the 2Omm eyepiece in place, point the telescope at some well-defined land target (e.g. a telephone pole or building) at least 200 yards away. This may be done manually or by using the fine tracking controls (control knobs). With target object centered in the field, tighten the control lock knobs.
  2. Look through the finderscope and tighten or loosen, as appropriate, the finderscope’s alignment screws until the crosshairs of the finderscope are precisely centered on the same object already centered in the telescope’s field of view.
  3. Once this is accomplished objects located first in the finderscopes field of view will also be centered in the main telescope. (Note: the image presented by the finderscope will be upside-down and reversed)

A:

Properly balancing the scope will make it easier to work with. Use the following steps to help you out.

  1. Arrange the telescope so that the telescope body is horizontal to the floor (latitude of 0 degrees). Loosen the R.A. (right ascension) lock-knob. With R.A. lock loosened, the telescope mount will turn freely about the polar axis. Rotate the telescope about the polar axis so that the counterweight shaft is parallel to the ground (horizontal).
  2. Loosen the counterweight’s lock screw, and slide the counterweight along the shaft until the telescope remains in any given position without tending to drift in either direction. Then re-tighten the counterweight lock screw to lock the counterweight in position.
  3. To balance the telescope about the declination axis. First loosen the declination lock knob, then slightly loosen the clamp ring screws so that the telescope main tube can slide inside the rings. Slide the main tube up or down inside the rings until the telescope is balanced about the declination axis. Re-tighten the clamp ring screws. The telescope is now balanced.

A:

Good or poor viewing is not always determined by the optics of a telescope. There can be external factors determining the quality of an image. The blanket of air surrounding the earth is constantly in motion. This shifting and swirling of the atmosphere causes a poor image especially at higher powers. This constantly changes so some nights may be better for viewing than others.

Optical distortions made by the rippling of air currents emitting above a heated surface or area can cause a poor image. Objects are more distinct when viewing straight up because you are only viewing through an atmosphere of about 10 miles thick. This is opposed to an atmosphere 15 miles thick at 45 degrees, and over 100 miles thick near the horizon.

Light pollution: If possible avoid using your scope around lights (street lights. house lights. etc.). A high magnifying telescope is very sensitive to light, resulting in a washed out image or an annoying glare. The effects of bright light become more obvious near cities. Many of the stars seem to disappear near the city horizon.

Moonlight can be another factor. The harsh glare from a full or bright moon can dim nearby stars and planets. The moon itself is best viewed during the phases near the area dividing the darkness and sunlight.

Avoid viewing through an open window (never view through a closed window). The air currents caused by the inside/outside temperature, especially during the cold season makes quality observation impossible.

A bank of clouds is impossible to view through. Fortunately these are constantly moving. When stars twinkle rapidly, this is a result of the warm and cool air mixing. This results in poor viewing. Try to observe on nights when the stars have a steady ‘burn’ like the planets. A heavy haze causes poor viewing but a faint haze usually means a still atmosphere and good viewing may be possible. Stars always appear as pinpoints of light. They are at such great distances that any discernible size difference between very low and high magnifications within the telescope is impossible. The light gathering power of the telescope allows you to see stars and planets that your eyes would not normally see within the solar system.

Most telescopes give their widest field of view at lowest power – usually not more than 1-1/2 degrees. This means it is frustratingly difficult to find anything in the sky with the telescope alone. A small telescope called a finderscope is mounted parallel on the side of the main scope to get around this problem. The low powered finderscope with its four to six degree field of view and central crosshairs permits precise aiming before you look through the main body of the telescope.

A:
Telescopes with power ranging from 25X to 50X can be used to view Star Clusters and Nebulae. 90X to 120X telescopes can view galaxies. Most planets can be seen at 150X and higher.

A:
The numbers of the eyepiece represent the focal length of the eyepiece.

A:
Refractor telescopes use lenses only (no mirrors or prisms). The refractor is essentially a closed tube design. It is mechanically uncomplicated and basically maintenance free. Refractors are generally used for astronomical viewing; however, they can be used for terrestrial purposes beyond 100 feet.

A:
An upside down and reversed image is a common characteristic of most astronomical telescopes. Since telescopes are used for astronomical viewing orientation is not important. The image in the finderscope will also be upside down and reversed.

A:
Over/under exposed night time images can be an issue if the camera isn’t set up correctly. On applicable models, the Night Vision (NV) Shutter and LED Control settings can be adjusted to address the brightness of a night time image. The NV shutter address how quickly the shutter opens/closes, and the LED control dictates how many of the camera’s IR LED’s fire for a night time image.

A:
Battery life will vary with operating temperature and the number of images taken over time. Typically, a camera will be able to capture several thousand images before the batteries die. Battery type can also play a factor. Bushnell recommends the use of Energizer Ultimate Lithium AA batteries to obtain maximum battery life. Alkaline batteries may also be used; however, camera performance may be affected. Rechargeable batteries are not recommended, as they have a lower operating voltage and can render the camera inoperable.

A:

A camera has what is known as a “false trigger” if the PIR sensor thinks that there is motion and heat in front of the camera lens when there is no subject in the image. These “False Triggers” are the result of placing the camera in an environment where there is motion associated with tree branches creating motion in front of the camera or an area where there is high heat in the foreground and any motion from wind could set off the camera. Setting a camera up over water is also a potential cause for this issue.

To remedy this situation try moving the camera to an area that does not have any of these issues or try changing the sensor level on the menu settings.

If the camera continues to take images when there is no subject in them, try placing the camera in an inside environment and aiming at a location where there is no motion. If the camera continue to show issues, then there is probably an electronic component issue. If this is the case, please contact our customer service to send the camera back for repair.

A:
Bushnell recommends the use of SanDisk SDHC SD cards with a maximum of 32GB storage capacity. For models made before 2010, please reference the camera’s instruction manual for the maximum SD card size. For video recording, we recommend the SanDisk Ultra 32GB Class 10 UHS-1 SDHC cards.

A:
When using Field Scan, make sure that the stop and start times of Field Scan “A” and “B” do not overlap. For example; do not set the start time of “B” to 8AM if the end time of “A” is 10AM. It’s also worth noting that when using video mode for field scan, the minimum interval time is 5 minutes to prevent the potential overheating of the batteries and electronic components. In photo mode the minimum interval time is 1 minute.

A:
After selecting the Camera Name Input parameter, use the left and right arrow keys to select the letters and numbers desired for the camera name. For deleting letters utilize the “←” symbol on the keypad.

A:
Coordinate input allows the user to input latitude and longitude coordinates for the camera’s location. This data will be embedded in the files saved on the camera’s SD card (if “On” is selected). This makes it possible to see each camera’s location as a “pushpin” on Google Earth maps when reviewing a folder full of photos from multiple cameras.

A:
If the camera isn’t saving images or videos to the SD card try formatting the SD card in the trail camera setup menu (Format Execute). If the problem persists the SD card may need to be reformatted in a computer to a FAT32 file format.

A:
From time to time Bushnell will release software updates for the Trophy Cam series of cameras. You can view available updates at https://www.bushnell.com/bu-product-software-updates.html

Note: Installing the incorrect firmware on your camera can brick (permanently lock up) the main circuit board of the camera and render it inoperable.

A:
High resolution credits are available immediately after purchase. After requesting a High-Res, the selected image will have a thin orange border around it. The high-resolution copy of the image will be transmitted the next time the camera contacts the network, whether via triggered image or nightly check-in. A bold orange border will surround the selected image when the high-resolution copy is available to download.

A:
Yes. There is no limit as to how many cameras can be on one account.

A:
No. Bushnell considers your images to be your private property and will never access them without your explicit permission.

A:
Each camera needs to be enrolled in a data plan to transmit photos. If one camera runs out of thumbnails before the plan renewal date, the other cameras on the account will share with it.

A:
Log into your account on https://www.wirelesstrophycam.com/  and click on your name/email in the top right corner. From the drop-down menu click on Subscriptions. On the current subscriptions page, clock on the option to suspend/pause. Here you have the option to suspend the data plan until a specified date or to cancel the recurrence altogether.

A:
Once logged into your wireless account, select Cameras at the top. Click the settings icon on the camera you wish to remove. You will then see the option to Remove This Device in the top right of the screen.

A:

You can delete images on by selecting them manually or by filtering all the images. To select individually, hover your mouse over the image you wish to delete. You will see in the image banner a lock and a circle. Click on the circle and that will select the image. You will now see at the top of the screen the option to delete the image.

You can also delete images using the filter options. This is a good way to delete multiple unwanted photos at once. To delete images using the filter options, start by clicking on the filters icon. After choosing your filter criteria, you will see the images page change to show only the images meeting the filter requirement. Close the filters window and select the trashcan icon on the left. This will delete all the images previously filtered.

A:
Log into your account at https://www.wirelesstrophycam.com/ and select your name/email in the top right corner. From the drop-down menu select My Account. Select Edit Email and enter the new email. Click Update to confirm the new email. After updating, a confirmation email will be sent to the updated address.

A:

The Wireless Aggressor (119599C2) and Impulse (119900A/V) cameras have the option to enable GPS positioning via camera settings. The original Bushnell Wireless camera (119599C) does not have this feature.

Note: The GPS location is updated once a day during the cameras nightly check-in, provided it is in an area with adequate signal coverage.

A:

Modem Init Fail is an indicator that the camera can’t successfully connect to the network. Causes for this could include:

  • Improper or corrupted formatting on the SD card
  • Poor signal strength in the camera’s location
  • No data available for the camera to connect to the network.

Please contact Technical Support by clicking the following link: ultimosupport.co.za

A:

The original Wireless camera, 119599C has a flash range of up to 45’.

The Wireless Aggressor camera, 119599C2, has a flash range of up to 80’.

The Impulse camera, 119900A/V, has a flash range of up to 100’.

A:

Bushnell offers the following solar panels and security boxes for our cellular cameras

119599C
Solar Panel: 119656c
Security Box: 119655c

119599C2
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119900A/V
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The Bushnell Impulse camera will transmit field scan images and videos. The original Wireless camera and Wireless Aggressor will transmit only live triggered images.

Impulse Wireless Trailcams

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When using video mode, the camera will send the first frame of the video to your images list. Videos will have a play button icon on the image to help differentiate from a standard image.

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To request complete video*, first click on the video thumbnail. On the video thumbnail page select the option to Request High-Res. Once the video is available you will see an arrow on the image within the images page.

*The Impulse camera can only transmit up to 20 seconds of video. If you set your camera to record more than 20 seconds, you will need to access the full video via the SD card.

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The lights on the front of the camera are real time cellular strength signal indicators. They are designed to help find an optimal location to place the camera.

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PIR Mode is the setting to control when the camera can trigger for live images. There are several options available on the Bushnell Impulse camera.

On- PIR will trigger image/video capture (Default).

Off- PIR will never trigger image/video capture

Day-PIR only triggers image/video capture in daylight or bright conditions

Night- PIR only triggers image/video capture during night or low light conditions.

Timer- PIR will allow you to enable or disable PIR triggers up to four times a day and only trigger during designated “blocks” of time. Up to 4 on/off states can be independently set up for Monday-Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Setting a block to “CAM: ON” or “CAM: OFF” determines whether the PIR sensor will trigger the camera to capture images or not, beginning at the time set for the block (and ending at the time set for the next block). If you set the last block of time for one day to on or off the camera will remain off until the first block of time for the next day. At that point it will switch to the on or off state set for the new time.

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Tracking mode is a feature that when enabled will have the camera update its GPS location every five minutes. Once Tracking mode is enabled, the only way to disable it to resume normal operation is by website or phone application.